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VHF Channel

aero3113aero3113 Member Posts: 8,930 ✭✭✭✭✭
Just met up with my cousin on the water. We had our VHF's on and we're communicating to each other. When we tied up we were wondering if there's a specific channel we should be on for friendly talk? 
2008 330EC

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    TonyWalkerTonyWalker Member Posts: 744 ✭✭✭
    http://boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/vhf.htm  Click on this.  It has a pretty good explaination of all the VHF marine channels and their uses.
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    aero3113aero3113 Member Posts: 8,930 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Great link, thank you!
    2008 330EC
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    MarkBMarkB Member Posts: 3,969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Definitely not on 16! That's for emergencies only. A lot of people talk on 69. Stay away from 24 as well as the coast guard uses that for non emergency dialogue.

    Boat Name: King Kong

    "Boat + Water = Fun"

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    MarkBMarkB Member Posts: 3,969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Do you have a radio license?

    Boat Name: King Kong

    "Boat + Water = Fun"

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    aero3113aero3113 Member Posts: 8,930 ✭✭✭✭✭
    MarkB said:
    Do you have a radio license?
    No, I don't 
    2008 330EC
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    MarkBMarkB Member Posts: 3,969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The course is very useful. There's some interesting stuff to learn. I recommend it.

    Boat Name: King Kong

    "Boat + Water = Fun"

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    rasburyrasbury Member Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭✭✭
    great info all also a site to look over!
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    MarkBMarkB Member Posts: 3,969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Aero also be careful without a radio license. Major fine if caught using without a license in Lake Ontario (Canadian side) for instance. US side is even more stringent. Not sure where you are but they likely need to see a license as well. 

    Do not use 16. That is for emergency calls only and in some cases initial hailing. Major offence to chat on that line. 

    Just don't want to see you getting into trouble.

    Boat Name: King Kong

    "Boat + Water = Fun"

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    pault1216pault1216 Member Posts: 206 ✭✭✭
    Last time I checked no license was required unless you operated outside the US (for US citizens). I had a ship station license in the 90s (expired) but still have a 3rd class Radio Telephone Operator's license (I think non-expiring).
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    rasburyrasbury Member Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭✭✭
    No license needed here, at least with my size vessel. Was interesting to read that if you have a radio you are required to have ir on and monitor 16. I kind of wondered how you would communicate boat to boat not knowing what channel other boats have on. O you start on 16 and then move to another channel. I did not think you are allowed to use 16 unless it WA an emergency. Once when we were traveling in a group we monitored a channel but sounds like we should have stayed on 16 until someone wanted to talk. That way, if someone else's nearby puts out a distress we would have heard it or a CG message, is that correct?
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    MarkBMarkB Member Posts: 3,969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    You can hail on 16, as in call another boat. But when the other boat responds he/she should ask you to move off that channel. You shouldn't stay on 16 chatting. You should switch to 69 for instance and carry on your conversation there. There is no point to block up channel 16 with normal dialogue.

    This is what they teach you at the radio course.

    Do you need to take a course to get a station license in the US?

    Boat Name: King Kong

    "Boat + Water = Fun"

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    rasburyrasbury Member Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yes mark, that's what I was saying..what would a station be?
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    MarkBMarkB Member Posts: 3,969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    69.

    Boat Name: King Kong

    "Boat + Water = Fun"

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    MarkBMarkB Member Posts: 3,969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    A lot of fishing an informal chat on that line.

    Boat Name: King Kong

    "Boat + Water = Fun"

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    Black_DiamondBlack_Diamond Member Posts: 5,439 ✭✭✭✭✭
    If your VHF radio is DSC enabled, it is a nice way to chat with other known boaters. Here is a nice write up:

    http://boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/dig0101.htm

    Past owner of a 2003 342FV
    PC BYC, Holland, MI
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    LaReaLaRea Member, Moderator Posts: 7,627 mod
    Working channels here in the US are 68, 69, 71, 72 and 78A.  Most people use 68 or 69 out of habit.  

    Hailing on 16 is short and sweet -- agree on a working channel, and get out.  For example, here's a hailing call from Angel to La Rea:

    A:  La Rea, La Rea - this is Angel on channel one-six, over.
    L:  Angel - this is La Rea, over.
    A:  La Rea, Angel - switch and answer six-eight, over.
    L:  Angel, La Rea - six-eight, out.
    A:  Angel, out.

    In some places, this would be considered too informal for 16.  

    When I'm on 16, I always identify myself and the other vessel on each transmission.  It's a good habit for the following reason: in an emergency, when there's chaos with multiple boats and first-responders, people need to know exactly who spoke to whom.  (Been there, done that.)  You have to practice it until you can do it without thought.  

    And the words "ten-four" have no place on channel 16.
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