Dock line size and length

aero3113aero3113 Long Island, NYPosts: 2,897Member ✭✭✭✭✭
What size line and length are you guys using for boats over 30’? My LOA is 35’, trying to figure out what I need.
Post edited by aero3113 on

Comments

  • reneechris14reneechris14 Pawcatuck river CTPosts: 2,237Member ✭✭✭✭
    bought 4 of these serval years ago great at the dock but tough at a raft up cleats fill up quickly. 1/2 is plenty good enough for the wieght.
    2005 Rinker FV342  Pawcatuck river,Ct
  • Dream_InnDream_Inn Annapolis, MDPosts: 5,516Member, Moderator mod
    edited November 24
    I'd say you need at least 1/2 inch.  I have a mix of half and 5/8 for mine depending on use.

    Oh, you asked for length as well.  Two 35', two 25', two 15'....as a minimum.

    Dream 'Inn III -- 2008 400 Express

  • aero3113aero3113 Long Island, NYPosts: 2,897Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks guys, I have a bunch of 1/2” and 5/8” from my 242, I’ll have to check lengths. I used 1/2” lines for my 242 that I would keep fixed from the pilings to the dock. You think these lines will be good to use if the length fits?
  • YYZRCYYZRC Georgian BayPosts: 117Member
    I’m using 1/2”. 15’ and 25’ lengths depending on the situation. 8” fenders. 
  • LaReaLaRea Alexandria VirginiaPosts: 3,617Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Half-inch is fine unless you're abandoning the boat in a hurricane, or leaving the boat moored for six months, or you want the lines to last for twenty years.  I have a bunch of 5/8" bought by the previous owner, and I wish they were all 1/2".  

    Go long.  You'll never complain about lines that are too long.  You'll complain when they are too short.  
  • PickleRickPickleRick Posts: 532Member ✭✭
    I keep 1/2 stowed wrapped around cleats on all 4 corners at all times for quick docking or tie up.  About 10ft.  

    I then keep a 5/8 about 20 ft stowed in the cockpit.  My transom tie off is 3/4 and 100 ft.  Left overs from a tree climber.  They must replace the rope when they fray.  It's sampson rope and floats.  
  • aero3113aero3113 Long Island, NYPosts: 2,897Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    @LaRea , are you sure the 5/8” line you have isn’t 3/4”? 5/8” is not too far off from 1/2”. I have some 3/4” that came with the boat and yes, feel it’s kinda big, but it does allow you to grip the line nicely.
  • mattiemattie Sarnia, OntarioPosts: 300Member ✭✭✭
    General rule: 
    Dock lines are 2/3 boat length.
    Spring lines = full boat length.

    1/2” double braided should be good. Like LaRea said 5/8” is a bit big for seasonal/pleasure use. Fills the cleat too quick.



    246BR, 276BR, H310BR current
  • PickleRickPickleRick Posts: 532Member ✭✭
    I love the 3/4 i have.  Great for tying off to trees or my beach anchor plus all the floats/chairs at night in case there is a storm. I dont like hunting down floats after an over night storm.  The little lady likes it because it floats and she uses it to pull her float back to the boat. My transom came with over sized cleats.  

    My only issue with recycled climbing or bull rope is they dont spring. They don't make good long term docking lines or nor anchor lines.  Cost new is 150 to 175, thats about the minimum legnth and a dollar a foot.  
  • Dream_InnDream_Inn Annapolis, MDPosts: 5,516Member, Moderator mod
    aero3113 said:
    @LaRea , are you sure the 5/8” line you have isn’t 3/4”? 5/8” is not too far off from 1/2”. I have some 3/4” that came with the boat and yes, feel it’s kinda big, but it does allow you to grip the line nicely.
    I agree.  I have a bunch of 5/8 that is fine.  I boat with someone that gets out 3/4 and it is just too much for rafting boats together.


    Dream 'Inn III -- 2008 400 Express

  • StodgeStodge Lake St. ClairPosts: 2,585Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 25
    I have 4 25 foot mooring lines from https://mooringlines.com/  As well as one of their pre-made spring lines.  I have a pair on my center console too.  Really like how the lines stay soft and hold up.  

    The only downside to getting lines from these guys is that they do NOT have a web order interface so you have to call.

    2002 FV 342 on Lake St. Clair - Past Commodore SHC - Vessel Examiner USCGAUX

  • Cableguy GregCableguy Greg Pittsburgh, PAPosts: 4,017Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    One thing I did was change the color of my lines depending on length. 15 foot lines are red, 20 foot lines are blue, 25 foot lines are black and my 35 foot line is white. Makes it easy when giving instructions to a mate that isn’t familiar with what to do. 
    2008 280 Express Cruiser, 6.2MPI, B3, Pittsburgh, PA "Blue Ayes"
    Go Steelers!!!
  • shawnmjrshawnmjr Detroit MIPosts: 1,446Member ✭✭✭✭
    While we are on the subject of dock lines I have found that soaking your lines at the end of the season for a couple of weeks in a bucket / tote  with water and a bottle of fabric softener keeps the lines in new condition and smells great all season. 
  • mattiemattie Sarnia, OntarioPosts: 300Member ✭✭✭
    One thing I did was change the color of my lines depending on length. 15 foot lines are red, 20 foot lines are blue, 25 foot lines are black and my 35 foot line is white. Makes it easy when giving instructions to a mate that isn’t familiar with what to do. 
    Been meaning to do exactly that. I have all black double braided. They look nice - but would be a lot quicker to deal with - all specific colors.
    246BR, 276BR, H310BR current
  • aero3113aero3113 Long Island, NYPosts: 2,897Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    You can put different color shrink wrap or electrical tape on them near the eyelet. Much cheaper than buying new lines. I have 4 new 20’ lines from my 242, do you think I can get away with them and I’ll get 2 35’? 
  • LaReaLaRea Alexandria VirginiaPosts: 3,617Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Most captains would agree that you shouldn't buy oversized lines.  Some see line diameter as a macho factor, but it makes everything more difficult ... handling, cleating, knotting and storing.  Oversized lines cost more and take longer to dry, and there's basically no benefit compared to correctly-sized lines.  

    My boat weighs less than 20k pounds.  In normal boating, I rarely find myself in conditions where I need something bigger than a 1/2" double-braided line.  When I do, I go to the 5/8".  I'd never buy 3/4" because it doesn't fit my cleats.  

    (And don't get me started about captains who will use some crappy 20-year-old nylon line that's stiff as a board, but they can't bear to throw it away because they got it for free from their cousin who sold his boat.)  
  • Dream_InnDream_Inn Annapolis, MDPosts: 5,516Member, Moderator mod
    shawnmjr said:
    While we are on the subject of dock lines I have found that soaking your lines at the end of the season for a couple of weeks in a bucket / tote  with water and a bottle of fabric softener keeps the lines in new condition and smells great all season. 
    I do this with my anchor rode each spring.  It keeps it white and easier for the windlass to grab.

    Dream 'Inn III -- 2008 400 Express

  • icoulthaicoultha Niskayuna NYPosts: 1,312Member ✭✭✭
    Dream_Inn said:
    shawnmjr said:
    While we are on the subject of dock lines I have found that soaking your lines at the end of the season for a couple of weeks in a bucket / tote  with water and a bottle of fabric softener keeps the lines in new condition and smells great all season. 
    I do this with my anchor rode each spring.  It keeps it white and easier for the windlass to grab.
    I did my rode last winter also - in a tub fr a while to soak out dirt then a period in water and softener,

    Dock and fender lines  - they all go in the washing machine a few at a time and get a good wash and spin out with fabric softener added then hung up to dry in my basement furnace cupboard where they stay warm and dry all winter.

    Regards,

    Ian

    The Third “B”

    Rear Commodore, Crescent Boat Club

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