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Captiva 212 BR on the west coast ocean

Wondering if anyone has taken a Captiva 212 BR on Mission Bay, San Diego Bay, or offshore. Any input on what size seas it handles and what size to stay away from?
Bought new in Coeur d'Alene Idaho. It's really my dog's boat....

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    Lake_BumLake_Bum Member Posts: 954 ✭✭✭✭
    I'd be hesitant to take it offshore, unless you stayed CLOSE, and had up to date weather reports.  That's a tiny boat for the ocean!  
    2000 Captiva 232 
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    bindunibinduni Member Posts: 22
    Thanks for the feedback!

    I'm really conflicted - yes, I'd stay fairly close to shore (1-2 miles), I've been out on tiny sailboats (20 - 22) in unbelievable calm water along the SoCal coast, and the local rental place let's their 18 & 19 footers with 40 horse OB go out. Of course, I agree that it is all weather dependent and one must have the right equipment (VHF, chartpotter, depthfinder at min).

    Anyone had experience taking a 21 footer out off the SoCal coast?

    Bought new in Coeur d'Alene Idaho. It's really my dog's boat....
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    bindunibinduni Member Posts: 22
    Not to prolong this thread, but to give some sense of seas, on Saturday there were 1ft waves with a 46ft period off the coast of Oceanside. 
    Bought new in Coeur d'Alene Idaho. It's really my dog's boat....
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    212rowboat212rowboat Member Posts: 2,591 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I run my 212br offshore all the time.  Just use some sense. 
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    212rowboat212rowboat Member Posts: 2,591 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Apologies, phone rang as I was typing.... 

    The 212 does well offshore in calm seas... The difference between big lakes and offshore is wave frequency, and its actually easier I would wager, and more predictable. The inlets certainly are tricky, bit after you get past the marker youre generally fine. 


    Of course this is east coast... 

    The only advice id offer is always leave some throttle to spare, as you need acceleration at times especially through the inlet... Either to out run a wave in following tides or to chase a roller before its a breaker, also in the inlet, and while confronting tides. 
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    PickleRickPickleRick Member Posts: 3,920 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ocean are generally further apart in frequency as well as less squared than lake waves.  The shallow gulf is prone to lake style wave.  

    Its a little unfair to compare a sailboat (displacement hull) of any size to a planning hull.  The flat bottom can of our boats can and will pound if you're not paying attention to what you're doing.  If you work the tabs/throttle and angle you can handle some good size waves in any sized planing hull so long as they are gentle rollers and the frequency is far enough apart to not plant the bow.  At times youre not going to be able to keep on plane, mileage will suffer.  Running out of fuel is a danger.  Id never go off shore without a sea anchor or atleast some 5 gallon buckets and extra life jackets to rig some yourself. 

    On a 20 to 22ft sailboat you have atleast 700 lbs, close to 50% of the weight is in the keel below the water line.  The displacement hull makes cutting through waves a more comfortable ride.  

    On the east coast i see 17 to 19ft boats running 3 to 10 miles out to fish reefs when the weather is nice. 1 mile off shore or 60, you're not going to be swimming back.   

    Rimas, a European immigrant sailed(i use the term sailed loosely, he drifted) in a san juan 22 or 23 to where the coasties resuced him when grounded in Alaska.  Then got another the same size and drifed to Hawaii from cali where authorities had to tow him in.  His goal was going around the world.

    He sailed kon tiki style as he put it with no motor and the dude doesn't know how to sail.  

    A Catalina 22 i parted out would make 40 to 60 mile trips out to fish the gulf steam when weather was ideal, this was back in the late 80s early 90s.  He ran out of Charleston.  

    Lots of little sailboats have sailed to Hawaii.








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    212rowboat212rowboat Member Posts: 2,591 ✭✭✭✭✭
    i've been 15~16 miles offshore on a jetski before... i've even 'lapped' the island (emald isle nc) several times on jetski's.. when i want to go to shackleford banks or cape lookout- or even hateras, the sea will determine whether i shoot offshore or if i run the intercoastal waterways.. 

    one time, in band camp (i pun) as i was leaving the inlet and stationary at the #1 bell buoy waiting for others to clear the inlet (traffic, that day) a freakin' tiller steered john boat passes me with a single passenger.. i remember thinking that guy had a death wish... 

    point being, there are times it isn't a problem, and times it is.  they are obvious.  the bottleneck will always be the inlets and tides- as even on a calm day on the ocean, the tides rip the inlets and they can change not 'fast', but SUDDENLY.  As an example i have a close friend, a current shrimp boat captain but former 600ton vessel licensed and operating captain- lived more of his 70 years off shore than on land dang near- he lost his 24' center console coming back through the inlet maybe three or possible four years ago now... clear blue skies, but tides were ripping... his engine failed at the trickiest point, the first wave broke over the transom and pushed him sideways, and the second one rolled the boat.  done. just like that. and happened to a guy who knows what he's doing as second nature.  they found his gear (he'd engraved a lot of his stuff) all up and down the beach that season.  he 'gunned' the engine as a wave was catching him, and it coughed and died.  that simple.  of course he's okay and lived to tell what happened, but.... he didn't have tow insurance on that boat, and the recovery and tow to port appraised more than the boat was worth..... so... he signed it over as salvage. 

    there is really no difference being offshore in my opinion than on a mountain lake except for tides.  and with the exception it can change quickly and sometimes for no apparent reason... so, just exercise more awareness and for certain have the ability to communicate (radios's) and sea anchors as mentioned. 
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