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Winterizing - Indoor Heated

JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭

So in another week I am going to drive my boat about an hour to an indoor heated storage place. This will be my first year winterizing, so I need some advice.

1. I am going to run some type of antifreeze with corrosion resistance into the engine, drain the water tank, and make sure the transom shower & sink lines are dry. I have a porta-potty with pumpout, so I'll probably just take the toilet out instead of having it pumped.

2. I JUST changed the oil (due to it being diluted with gas - thermostat issue), so I plan on leaving the oil in and putting fresh in the spring. Is that sound?

3. Should I drain the drive fluid or just leave it until next spring? I plan on having the drive pulled next spring to check it out before my 1 year "bumper to bumper" warranty is over.

4. I've got a bottle of Sta-Bil (rated for 80 gallons) that I'm going to put in. I plan on topping off before the trip, so I'll probably use ~ 14 gallons on the ride to the marina. Should I put the sta-bil in when I fill up, or wait until I'm there and run the engine for a couple minutes right before pulling it out?

 

Any other suggestions are welcome. :)

2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3

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    Dream_InnDream_Inn Member, Moderator Posts: 7,594 mod
    I wouldn't drain the fluid, especially if not going to fill it.  If you are pulling in the spring, then they will change it then.  Put the stabil in before you leave, that way it is ran thru all the lines and engine.  Also, if you put the boat away clean, will be much easier to keep clean all year.

    Dream 'Inn III -- 2008 400 Express

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    JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭
    Yeah I am going to have to scrub/power wash the bottom a bit as I didnt paint the bottom. It'll be shiny & fresh for its short nap this winter.
    2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3
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    Michael TMichael T Member Posts: 7,227 ✭✭✭✭✭
    This month's Boating Magazine has some great articles on winterizing - particularly engines, with some very important points on winterizing diesels in light of the new diesel fuel challenges. You might like to go online if you don't have access to the hard copy. :-) MT
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    JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭
    I've read it, but they all pretty much cover outdoor storage. I'll be indoor heated with multiple backups, so I'm just trying to figure out how much is necessary.
    2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3
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    Michael TMichael T Member Posts: 7,227 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2013
    My opinion, fill up or top up with non ethanol gas if you can. Put the stabil in your tank then run it to the marina. It is always best to change engine oil (hot) before you put your boat up for the winter because "used" engine oil contains acids, water vapours and dissolved minerals that corrode the engine over the winter. You've already done that - check. As for the drive I would say it depends - if you have run it hard and it has been heated up real good a few times (are there calcified deposits on the drive tower top?) if so, change it now. If not, you can wait until the spring to change it - it doesn't matter quite as much now that we are all using synthetic lube. I believe Dream_Inn gave some great tips on using de-humdiifying containers and hangers - that is always a real dood idea - even if you store your boat indoors. So, jktz13 I think you have done a great job of getting your boat ready. P.S. Have the techs check your gimbal, bellows, mercathode etc next spring before that bumper-to-bumper expires. MT
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    JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2013
    Drive lube looks new in the reservoir, and I havent had any real long trips this year, so I plan on leaving it until the inspection next spring.

    And yeah I'm going to top off the fuel and add the Sta-bil before the 40 mile trip, so it'll definitely be distributed throughout the engine.

    At this point the only area I'm going back & forth on is fogging the cylinders. It's really only going to be 5 months of down-time in a climate controlled building. I wonder if its really necessary to fog the fuel lines & cylinders? Maybe instead of running 2 stroke mixture into the fuel rails I could pull each plug and spray fogging oil directly into the cylinders?
    2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3
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    Black_DiamondBlack_Diamond Member Posts: 5,439 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The lube in the reservior will always look new. Drain it and flush it out too. You'll be surprised what is in the bottom (sludge).

    Past owner of a 2003 342FV
    PC BYC, Holland, MI
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    JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭
    I'm sure, but I plan on having the drive pulled off next spring and will change the fluid then.

    It's only got 55 hours total, as it was brand new this year.
    2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3
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    212rowboat212rowboat Member Posts: 2,591 ✭✭✭✭✭
    amsoil makes a spray fog... spray it directly into your throttle body, but not enough to kill engine. 
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    Michael TMichael T Member Posts: 7,227 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2013
    jktz13, great advice from BD -the drive lube is a gravity feed and does not circulate and therefore should not show evidence of drive lube failure and there is often "sludge" in the bottom of the resevoir. As well Drew is so right about the fogging. I have always done it or had it done. I think Drew is also right on regarding not enough fogging to stall the engine - which is exactly what we used to do - because as Al memtioned that can gum up new "style" sensors. In this case a little is more. MT
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    JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭
    Is it worth even risking the sensors when I can just pull the plugs and spray directly into the cylinders? I know the intake doesnt get get the oil coating doing it that way, but I assume its aluminum and doesnt really need the corrosion protection? Not too worried about the injectors and rails as I'll have a healthy dose of Stabil in them.
    2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3
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    212rowboat212rowboat Member Posts: 2,591 ✭✭✭✭✭
    that's a good plan.. just don't over-do it with the spray... the valve seats can dry, which makes the initial turn over in the spring **** them, but that can be averted by spraying, all eight cylinders, and then turning the engine over either by hand or by hitting the starter for a second or two... the real value of using the spray type amsoil is also getting into the valve train and getting a coat on them... that stuff clings more so than motor oil, which can drain off during long term storage..

    you can get super duper paranoid about it, and drain and fill with an antique/classic car specific oil, and then change it again in the spring.. that stuff has components specific to engines that will sit around a lot, and run a little.. I think the additive is heavy zinc, but I can't be certain (coming from memory).. you DON'T want that running through a catalytic converter, if you're equipped (I know I asked you before, but I can't remember that either)... the cats can't burn that, and it stays behind as a residue that is caustic and that has potential to allow clogging, or, so it's said... I've never had a single issue with it..
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    JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭

    Well I halfway planned on pulling each plug anyways, due to the running too cold issue. I want to at least clean them off in case they got a little fouled due to running rich & multiple misfires.

    Maybe wait for that until spring, and run the amsoil through the TB for the winter storage is the best reasonable option? Just thinking out loud.......

    2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3
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    212rowboat212rowboat Member Posts: 2,591 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The only hesitation I have with spraying into the intake is the map, the iac, and the ait sensors... You can pull them, pull the coil wire, turn the engine with the starter, and spray away past the butterflies into the plenum... You can spend half a can that way.. then pull the valve cover vent (pcv) and spend a quarter can, pull the fill on the other and spend the rest- all while spraying and turning the engine with the starter at the same time... Call it cold fogging... It works and works well.. when your done, reinstall the sensors and coil.. lightly spray the engine with water, use a leaf blower to dry (laugh if you will, but this is awesom for getting contaminants off the engine, and then the water off).. when you've done that, spray the engine down liberally with a can of silicone spray, but try not to coat the belts or alternator.. it won't hurt them, but it does them no good, either... Badaboom- that's that until spring...

    If you weren't climate controlled, I'd highly rec you blow the h2o out of the block.. but aren't you closed circuit cooling? You can buy a home kit for checking acid level of coolant and go from there whether you treat it or not... Flush the Hades out of the drive, again, if even a hint it'll freeze, antifreeze it on final flush... Silicone it, too, after spraying with water and leaf blowing it dry...

    By the way- silicone on vinyl won't hurt it at all, and will offer a layer of protection during storage that could otherwise stain... Also, vasoline your battery terminals just in case.. nothing is better to prevent corrosion... You can use it on your battery switch terminals or anywhere electrical corrosion can happen.. a coat of silicone spray on the back of your gauges is a good idea, or anywhere else water may have deposited that may cause ghosts in the machine come next spring.... Or the next.... :-)
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    JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭
    I dont have FWC, but I do plan on draining the block and filling with antifreeze. This is more for anti-corrosion vs. temp concerns though.

    I plan on pulling the batteries and putting on a trickle charger at home.
    2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3
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    JoeStangJoeStang Member Posts: 1,122 ✭✭✭✭
    So I wrapped it up today. The algae on the bottom was a little more difficult to get clean than I had planned, but with some scrubbing & ZEP it is mostly factory clean. I'll probably do another quick scrub-down in the spring. I washed and threw a quick coat of wax on the colored hull too, so its nice & shiny for spring.

    I pulled the batteries which was easy. On the other hand the engine hatch is going to be a B!TCH to get up next year. Its gotta weigh at least 150lbs and no great hand "holds" to pull up. Oh well, cross that bridge when it comes. I'm definitely going to cut a 2x4 for next year, as I was trusting my boat hook to hold it up while I pulled the batteries. It'd be really nice if they included a jumper for the lift on the outside, but no dice....

    I ran -50 coolant (it took 4 gallons) and fogged per Mercury's requirements. I figured better safe than sorry, and its better to have no question about the warranty. It was quite a bit easier than I expected, and I'm happy it went easily.
    2013 276 Cuddy ~ 350 MAG / B3
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