Options

Launching/Recovering

I finally got the boat cranked on muffs and changed out all my fluids (first time doing it). We were lucky enough to find a storage unit less than a mile from the closest lake and put the boat in the water for a test run. I recently purchased a 12 f-250 to pull my 230 EC, my half ton just wasn't cutting it. Anyway I'm still having to put the back tire in the water almost to the rim to get the boat off the trailer, that's using almost full reverse thrust with the drive trimmed about 3/4 of the way down. Am I doing something wrong? Last year we went to a different lake with a steeper ramp and my anchor knocked the bow cushion when I was trying to get it off the trailer and was somewhat of a pain. There is a steeper ramp that's close by that I will most likely try. Just wanting opinions from the experts to make sure Im not missing something or a different technique that's easier. On another note my wife put the boat on the trailer her first try! Just had to mention that, lol.

Joe
2007 230 ECC 350 Mag MPI Alpha 1

Comments

  • Options
    youstolemybeeryoustolemybeer Member Posts: 246 ✭✭✭
    If you only boat in one lake, see if they have a marina with wet slips. If they do, rent one for the year and forget all this trailer nonsence. Or see if the marina has rack storage.   MUCH EASIER than trailering. And as an extra, you can sell off the big truck and save gas money.
  • Options
    howardramshowardrams Member Posts: 223 ✭✭✭
    It sounds normal to have to bury your trailer wheels deeper into the water to get your boat to float right on or off.  Did that for 22 years with my old 235.  Just keep the axles greased and check the seals occasionally.  Bearing buddies help with that.  Check and clean, repack grease more if you're in salt water.
  • Options
    howardramshowardrams Member Posts: 223 ✭✭✭
    You didn't mean your truck wheels were in the water did you?  That would be an awfully short gradual ramp.  If so have your tongue weight checked and maybe your winch support needs to be adjusted rearward so the boat sits about 6" farther back.  A trailer setup place with scales can help with that.
  • Options
    usafaviatorusafaviator Member Posts: 41 ✭✭
    Yes truck wheels in the water, the first trip out the tires were 4-6 inches in the water.  No slips available at the lake we frequent. 
    2007 230 ECC 350 Mag MPI Alpha 1
  • Options
    99270fv99270fv Member Posts: 94 ✭✭
    you should not need to use reverse engine thrust to launch. back the boat far enough in the water so that the engine can get water. with the bow strap disconnected back further down the ramp at a brisk pace and apply the brakes sharply and the boat should slide off of the trailer
  • Options
    212rowboat212rowboat Member Posts: 2,591 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Nice rig... Shallow launches are a pita for a boat that size... I'm assuming your pic is on levelish ground.. Here's what I would do, and because you have the clearance... Get a three inch drop hitch... Flip it upside down so that it's a three in rise receiver... That bit of angle will help tremendously, but not enough to drop the transom on the ramp...

    A little tip, though, for what it's worth... Prepping for launch, I always let loose the winch lock, and unstrap the transom... I'll back down the ramp until I see the back of the boat float ever so slightly... Then I let loose the brake only to plant it firmly.. The usual response is the winch singing as it lets loose several feet of strap.

    One more thing.. tune and delete that truck... When she regenerates, that heat is redonkulous- as in north of 1000*... It won't get along well with that gelcoat. Plus, you'll gain a ton of ponies and pick up as much as three to five mpg's at highway cruising speed.
  • Options
    bigal6030bigal6030 Member Posts: 157 ✭✭
    I pulled a 230 Crownline for years with my Excursion never really had to get the tires very wet. Boat always drifted off the trailer. I used to get the rig lined up, give it a little gas in reverse hit the brakes hard and the boat would slip right off the bunks. Give it a try.

    Big Al - 2006 - 270 Express Crusier

    Home port: Hammond Ind.

  • Options
    l-skynyrdl-skynyrd Member Posts: 178 ✭✭✭

    Have you considered converting your trailer to rollers instead of bunks. The boat will roll on and off the trailer instead of sliding on the bunks, a lot less friction and boat will load with a lot less effort  and unload with no effort.  Just a thought.



    Len

    You have to love the water....

    Len & Robyn   342 FV  Freebird

  • Options
    212rowboat212rowboat Member Posts: 2,591 ✭✭✭✭✭
    while I would agree with you in almost every sense regarding this, Skynard, I would hesitate to do that if I were him, UNLESS I could find a deeper launch.

    it's the angle of the launch (shallow) that's causing him issue...  in such a case, it sounds like he'll be six inches deep on the rear wheel no matter what if he doesn't want to crack that transom off the hard pack. this isn't  a problem for shallow V or flat bottom boats. they just drift right off when the water is one third to half way up the hulls water line.  

    If I were him, I'd find another launch...

    my launch is deep and steep- I don't have the concerns he has- I can brake check the boat right off.. using bunks and relying (on dry bunks) friction to hold the boat until the back gets wet keeps mine planted until the brake check, and more often than not I'm not launching alone.. My wife stands by on the dock adjacent the launch with bow line in hand.. by the time I've parked, she has it lashed to the adjacent dock (out of the way of others launching) and idling...  The end of the ramp at high tide is in likely four feet of water, and is maybe thirty feet of ramp total.. that's a pretty good ramp angle.  At low tide it's tricky. In order to float the boat I'm risking dropping off the back of the ramp, which is abrupt and drops about three feet to the bottom... I've literally watched guys yank their axles off after dropping off the back. there is a sign that says "ramp ends here" and it really means it.  all of that said, the deep launches aren't an issue.. it's the shallow ones that are a problem.  else, risk planting your keel on the concrete and praying for higher pool/tide to show up and not have a leak..   
  • Options
    rasburyrasbury Member Posts: 8,282 ✭✭✭✭✭
    yep to all- I have a 270 I lauch with a 4x2 F150 at our normal really steep ramp and never get the tires wet so it's the degrees of slope that's getting you- the tip about the hitch is a good one as that might put it at a better angle to get it off the trailer- I'm just surprised your not having more issues getting it out of the water vs. in the water!
  • Options
    jhofmannjhofmann Member Posts: 430 ✭✭✭
    You may want to see if your bunks can be lowered without the boat hitting the fenders. I had to lower my bunks and fenders so the boat needed less water to float off the trailer. My club has a private ramp with no power on or off allowed. 
    Moving the boat more to the rear of the trailer may help, but you may have to move the axles back to maintain tongue weight. A change to rollers may make launching easier, but you get better hull support with bunks. In my opinion!
  • Options
    NavyCTRCNavyCTRC Member Posts: 303 ✭✭✭
    Best bet is just to find a new ramp.  www.activecaptain.com can be really helpful.
Sign In or Register to comment.