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feeling excited

  Saturday we pick up our new to us 2003 Fiesta vee 342, with the twin 350 mag mpi with b3's, we have a 135 mile ride from Deltaville VA, to the Middleriver, north of Baltimore,  what emergency parts do you all carry, for that just in case moment??   I'd like to be prepared 

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    bella-vitabella-vita Member Posts: 411 ✭✭✭
    Welcome,I know the felling got mine last year around this time could not wait to get in water.same for this year still waiting for marina to pull it out of garage.hopefully u won't need any emergency parts! I would say make shure vhf radio is working 
    2002 Rinker FV 342
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    TonyWalkerTonyWalker Member Posts: 744 ✭✭✭
    A couple of spare impellers might be a good thing.  Maybe a couple of quarts of engine oil.  A basic tool box too.  I am probably over prepared but I like being pro active.  I have few mechanical skills anymore but If I have a mechanical problem, there is almost always a fellow or two who DO know they are doing close by who are willing to help out.

    Also do not forget to check the locations of the life jackets.  Several years back, I went along with a fellow who had just purchased a (maybe also a 2003) 342 to help him deliver her from the point of purchase to his home dock.  A distance of maybe 135 miles as well.  It turned out there were no life jackets aboard.  We were promptly provided with one for each of us (total of 4 of us) when I pointed this out.

    You will enjoy your 135 mile trip to home dock.  And you should really get to know your new boat and appreciate her many merits.

    Tony
    Salt Shaker 342
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    BayrunnerBayrunner Member Posts: 177 ✭✭✭
    I agree make sure your VHF radio works and take your cell phone charger with you just in case.  I bought mine in September last year and can't wait to take it out.  I'm docked at Ports Seneca Marina.  Good luck and hope your trip goes well.
    Bayrunner -- FV312 - Simple Pleasure
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    TonyWalkerTonyWalker Member Posts: 744 ✭✭✭
    Also paper charts for the area you will be traveling.
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    Handymans342Handymans342 Member Posts: 10,375 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't carry spare parts. I have tow boat US
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    Michael TMichael T Member Posts: 7,227 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A handful of zip ties, a couple of ring clamps (bigger is better as they are just for emergency), some electrical waterproof tape. Before the trip warm up the engines, check for leaks at all clamped areas. Check the condition of the through hulls. Try (gently) to turn off the through hull valves. Do they move freely? Does your anchor work? What level of charge do your batteries show. Are your running and anchoring lights working?Take a pint of engine oil, gear lube and power steering fluid (you can always use them). pliers, adjustable wrench, set of screw drivers, USCG flare requirements. !s the transom drain plug installed?

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    pault1216pault1216 Member Posts: 206 ✭✭✭
    Definite on the BOAT US towing as well as impellers, fuses, fluids, and the locations/phone numbers of a couple good full service marinas in between. Good luck!
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    craigswardmtbcraigswardmtb Member Posts: 1,015 ✭✭✭
    Somehow my simple tool box turned into a massive toolbox with all kinds of unique tools. And then there is the box of spare parts. When I bought my first boat I took it about 100 miles through the great south Bay in NY in April prior to many channel markers being put in. The bay is essentially 3ft deep outside the channels... Hopefully your experience is less eventful than mine. 
    Is this your first boat?  The above recommendations are good. Just make sure you have all of the coast Guard approved items. Extra fluids and a spare serpentine belt is a good idea. 
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    RansnanRansnan Member Posts: 81 ✭✭
    edited March 2016
    Really good ideas, we'll definitely be taking all of your advise, we had a 23 footer 15 years ago and a 20 ft fish n ski the last few years, I have all the tools Imaginable, Serpentine belt and impeller are good ones
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    TonyWalkerTonyWalker Member Posts: 744 ✭✭✭
    edited March 2016
    So far, I have had two impellers fail.  The one for the generator failed while on the Trent-Severn and the one for the starboard engine failed while traveling south on the Mississippi.  Surprisingly, when you are on the Mississippi between Alton Ill and the Ohio River, you are pretty much on your own.  Only two marinas in that entire stretch.
     
    We were traveling along with our friends at this point, Don and Rosie aboard their boat "Just Rosie."  We had agreed that we would anchor in the "Little Diversion Canal," essentially a small bay, on the west side of the river.  The failure occurred on this leg of the trip.  After motoring along on the remaining good engine for hours, we reached the LDC and made the turn inbound.  We rafted along side Just Rosie, burned our way thru a few bottles of wine and after a wonderful dinner we all turned in.
     
    In the morning, Don and I (mostly Don) diagnosed the problem, replaced the impeller with one of my spares, reassembled my tool box and by noon, we were all on our way.
     
    I should describe the failure.  The hub and the body of the impeller are glued together to make it a single piece.  The glue is what failed.  It was deceptive because if you turned it by hand, it would act ok.  It took a lot of head scratching to solve the problem.
     
    Tony
    Salt Shaker 342
    Post edited by TonyWalker on
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    randy56randy56 Member Posts: 4,083 ✭✭✭✭✭
    stern drives? or IO
    Boat Name : 

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    craigswardmtbcraigswardmtb Member Posts: 1,015 ✭✭✭
    Those are one and the same. The 342 was either stern drives or rarely vdrives. 
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    WildboatingWildboating Member Posts: 957 ✭✭✭
    Make sure you have good, fitting life jackets which should be a given.  The first most important thing is a working VHF.  The next most important thing to have is the knowledge on how to use it.  Do both you and the admiral know how to call for help?  What if you are off shore do you know how to find your coordinates and provided them to your potential rescuers in dire straights?  I thing most people miss this, if you are not good with this or working under stress I highly recommend at least getting a VHF with DSC ( digital selective calling) that is configured to your gps and has a MMSI (maritime mobile service identifier) number.  Boats can be replaced, getting help to you quickly is your best piece of safety and piece of mind in my opinion.    Depending how far off shore you are going, a EPIRB would be my must have.
    2003 Rinker 342 Fiesta Vee, 350 Mag MPI, Bravo 3 2.20:1 w/ 22p 4 x4 props

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    partlowrpartlowr Member Posts: 119 ✭✭
    Congrats and enjoy!
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    LaReaLaRea Member, Moderator Posts: 7,627 mod
    One other important thing to bring: SPARE TIME, as in, DON'T be in a hurry.  

    Your heart will be screaming at you to hurry up and get underway.  Instead, you should relax, slow down and be deliberate in everything you do.  Check out every system thoroughly, and get familiar with the engine room.  This boat is a complex beast!

    Warm up the engines completely (10 minutes), and make sure the temperatures are stable.  If the engines have thru-hull raw water intakes, look at the strainers to make sure there is water flowing through them.  Don't let anybody rush you.

    Congrats - you'll love it!
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    MarkBMarkB Member Posts: 3,969 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Good words of advice LaRea. You are right. A cool captain, is a "cool" captain.

    Boat Name: King Kong

    "Boat + Water = Fun"

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