Electric and electric bielge pumps

rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
So my recent near death experience (well not really) with water in the bielge for sure has me looking over my pump. So as another member as suggested, I for sure should have more than- which I do. I have one by the motor and the one under the mid ship berth where the thru hulls for the a/c and the head and the shower sump are.
 So to test my pumps, there is a little part of the float that sticks out, assume if you raise that the pump should always come on under any circumstance correct?

I do not have any type of manual pump on board. I'm looking on line and see some but the hose is like two feet long-  so what do we get for a boat that need 4 or 5' of hose?

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Comments

  • Handymans342Handymans342 Member Posts: 8,745 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ras you over think everything
  • rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I am known for that...so what about a pump, what did you have?
  • reneechris14reneechris14 Pawcatuck river CTMember Posts: 2,800 ✭✭✭✭
    Yes twisting the little plastic tip and the pump will on. Then go to helm flip the switch and they both shall buzz now check the oil, gear lube, battery connections and coolant. Now captain your pretrip is almost complete. I do this every time I leave the dock, makes me feel responsible. 
    2005 Rinker FV342  Pawcatuck river,Ct
  • PickleRickPickleRick Member Posts: 2,301 ✭✭✭
    Your bilge pumps should work 2 ways.  A manual switch on the dash to turn them on.  The battery switch needs to be in the on position in order to use this one.

    The other way is automatic, when the float lever is raised.  It should have power at all times in case you're not at the boat when she takes on water.

    As for the manual bilge pump, i would pump mine into a bucket then dump bucket over board in an emergency situation.  Sailboaters keep them because off shore rogue waves happen but the cockpit in a sailboat isnt as deep as your bilge. Thus they dont need a hose as long. Still an item i feel better to have and not need than need and not have being that its the size of a bike tire pump. If your battrries go your bilge goes.  

    I only boat miles off shore for a week a year and dont even do it in my boats but my boats are generally better prepared with safety and back up safety gear than the boats i rent. 


    Keeping water out of a boat is an item worth over thinking 😉

  • Handymans342Handymans342 Member Posts: 8,745 ✭✭✭✭✭
    rasbury said:
    I am known for that...so what about a pump, what did you have?
    I had 2 pumps. Case one failed. Redundancy
  • PickleRickPickleRick Member Posts: 2,301 ✭✭✭
    2 is usually good. If the cabin wouldnt fill 10 inches deep before water got back to the bilge area id only have 2.  
  • LaReaLaRea Alexandria VirginiaMember Posts: 4,627 ✭✭✭✭✭
    A manual pump should be considered mandatory safety equipment.  You can get one with a hose long enough to reach out of your engine room.  

    There are many sea stories about the physical exhaustion that comes from bailing water with a bucket.  Yes, you're only moving the water a few vertical feet in a small express cruiser.  But think about lifting a full bucket every 15 seconds for 2-3 hours while you wait for a rescue.  With a tube-style manual pump, there's no wasted motion.

    This one will move 13 gallons per minute, which would keep up with a pretty good-sized hole in your hull (like a generator intake).  

    https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-marine--manual-bilge-pumps--P011_330_003_501?recordNum=1 
  • aero3113aero3113 Long Island, NYMember Posts: 5,521 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Even better, you can hard mount a manual pump so you don’t have to rush around to set up the portable hand pump. Pumps 14.5 gallons per minute. Tie it into an existing through hull fitting or add one. Might be something I’ll look into doing.

    Whale BP9005 Gusher Urchin Manual Bilge Pump - On-Deck Fixed Handle, up to 14.5 GPM Flow Rate, 1-Inch or 1 ½-Inch Hose Connection https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00144AQDC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_Cx9gEbD6SHVKV


    2008 330EC
  • rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks..i will be better prepared next time I go out...
  • GMSLITHOGMSLITHO Greenwood Lake NY Member Posts: 1,058 ✭✭✭
    Guess it depends where you boat inland or offshore I’m either on the Hudson River or a 9 mile lake so really not far from shore and usually so crowded I can easily get help if needed so I think I’m good with the 2 electric  bilge pumps 
  • LaReaLaRea Alexandria VirginiaMember Posts: 4,627 ✭✭✭✭✭
    It's not about offshore vs. inland.  Statistically, most sinkings happen in the slip, not underway.  A manual pump is small, light and cheap.  Why not carry one.  

    Besides, it'll never happen to us ... we carry safety equipment mostly so we can help that other boater who wasn't as well-prepared.  Right?   ;)
  • raybo3raybo3 Revere MAModerator Posts: 4,662 mod
    @LaRea I agree most sinkings happen at the dock but most of the time its because the bilge pump failed..... Just say'n
    2002 342 Fiesta Vee PC Point Of Pines YC Revere MA. popyc.org     [email protected]
  • rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 13
    that is a bad a$$ pump! I think I will get that and can keep it stored below with some hose...that would be perfect. Thanks @Larea
    Post edited by raybo3 on
  • WillhoundWillhound Lake Simcoe, Ontario, CanadaMember Posts: 3,150 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 13
    A manual pump or bailing device is mandatory here with or without bilge pumps. I have one like this that I just added an extra length of hose to more easily pump overboard. Corrugated sump pump hose worked. Some of these can be found with a hose on the inlet also so you don't even have to get down in the bilge to operate it.
    My arms are long enough that I can operate it by laying on my stomach on the cockpit sole. I often wonder though what I would do if I lost battery power and couldn't open the hatch....

    "Knot Quite Shore" - 2000 FV270
  • rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
    That one Lerea shows us for 50 bucks is pretty bad....thinking that's the way I will go....pumping to a bucket with basically same effort makes sense to me...
  • LaReaLaRea Alexandria VirginiaMember Posts: 4,627 ✭✭✭✭✭
    raybo3 said:
    @LaRea I agree most sinkings happen at the dock but most of the time its because the bilge pump failed..... Just say'n
    Yes, exactly!

    Say the boat springs a leak on a Sunday after you go home.  Your bilge pump failed two weeks ago, but you didn't know, so the boat starts filling with water.  When your dock neighbor calls you in a panic, you'll be glad to have that manual pump.  

    My paranoid brain can invent a hundred scenarios like that.  
  • rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
    So it's not just me....
  • StodgeStodge Lake St. ClairMember Posts: 2,732 ✭✭✭✭
    Willhound said:
    A manual pump or bailing device is mandatory here with or without bilge pumps. I have one like this that I just added an extra length of hose to more easily pump overboard. Corrugated sump pump hose worked. Some of these can be found with a hose on the inlet also so you don't even have to get down in the bilge to operate it.
    My arms are long enough that I can operate it by laying on my stomach on the cockpit sole. I often wonder though what I would do if I lost battery power and couldn't open the hatch....

    It's not a requirement to pass a Coast Guard vessel exam, but we do ask if they have anything to bail with should the need arise.  It's more of a "oh, never thought of that" question.

    2002 FV 342 on Lake St. Clair - Past Commodore SHC - Vessel Examiner USCGAUX

  • WillhoundWillhound Lake Simcoe, Ontario, CanadaMember Posts: 3,150 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Required in Canada.
    "Knot Quite Shore" - 2000 FV270
  • LaReaLaRea Alexandria VirginiaMember Posts: 4,627 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Another example:  your electric pump works, but it can't keep up with the leak.  If you have a manual pump, you have at least a chance of staying afloat until help arrives.  

    Yeah Ras, you're not the only paranoid one!
  • davidbrooksdavidbrooks GermantownMember Posts: 725 ✭✭✭
    On my last boat i was getting a coast guard inspection and the inspector asked if i had a manual pump or bucket in case of electric failure or bilge pump failure.  I reached over and pulled out the trash can by the sink and said yes.  She checked the box and said good.  My wife looked at me after she walked away and said "You totally pulled that out your @ss didn't you?" 
    It's 5 O'Clock Somewhere!
  • reneechris14reneechris14 Pawcatuck river CTMember Posts: 2,800 ✭✭✭✭
    This one is half the price because it doesn't say marine on it. I leave this in my dinky witch is on the swimplatfrom. 
    2005 Rinker FV342  Pawcatuck river,Ct
  • rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
    door empty beer cans count?? I'm going to spring for that 50 one...it's a long dang way to the bottom of the bilege to over the side....it has to be around 8'?
  • aero3113aero3113 Long Island, NYMember Posts: 5,521 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @rasbury , I’m sure your hatch area has drains, you can pump it right into the drain if the hose fits, or put a fitting on the end so it will fit.
    2008 330EC
  • rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
    drains? Not that I know of...I guess I could pull off the hose where the electric one goes out and hook in there, that what your talking about?? Then the very bottom of the pump has to go down to the bottom of the bulge and that still 4'? I like that other one...looks like you could really do some pumping and get better leverage to do so...and be on the deck and not swimming down in the bilge. 
  • aero3113aero3113 Long Island, NYMember Posts: 5,521 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The channel that the hatch lays in, there aren’t any drains there?
    2008 330EC
  • aero3113aero3113 Long Island, NYMember Posts: 5,521 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 13
    When you hose down your top deck, where does the water go?
    2008 330EC
  • LaReaLaRea Alexandria VirginiaMember Posts: 4,627 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Right - the edge of the engine hatch has a channel that drains out the back.  In a pinch, you could pump right into that.  Or, really, any place in the cockpit that doesn't backflow into the engine room.  
  • rasburyrasbury Sanford, FLMember Posts: 6,700 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yes but that would not handle 14 gallons a minute...it would be going back in the bielge...guys we are talking 30 more bucks to be on the deck (dry), throwing a hose into the beilge and another hose out the back and pumping out some water!  30 bucks!
  • LaReaLaRea Alexandria VirginiaMember Posts: 4,627 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Why guess.  Next time I'm at the boat, I should crank a water hose into the engine bay, and see what sort of leak I could fight with the handheld.  
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